Handy Advice For Gardening The Organic Way

One of the benefits (if you can call it that) of chemically-enhanced produce is that it grows bigger, faster and cheaper than organic produce. But the risk factor involved is just too much for some people to live with, and thus they attempt to grow their own produce organically. If you fit this bill, check out these gardening tips.

For the fall season, plant a few fall edible plants in your garden containers. Beautiful selections of kale and mustard greens, have lovely shades of greens and purples and offer different textures to the arrangement. Add a few edible pansies to bring color to the green textures. The combination is fetching and will last well into the winter.

Cooling weather of early fall signals the opportune time to plant seasonal edibles. This year, instead of using your regular clay pots to plant your kale and lettuce, use a pumpkin as the container instead! Once you cut an opening at the top of the pumpkin and scoop out the insides, spray the inside and edges with Wilt-Pruf to keep the pumpkin from rotting. Now this is completed, it is time to get planting!

A good tip of what to plant in the garden is to plant high-value crops. Value is a subjective term, but plant the things that are most costly to buy, as long as they are suited to the climate. The whole garden does not have to be devoted to this, but if an area is earmarked for this type of crop, it can save money in the coming season when prices are sky high for certain crops.

Are you wondering if you need to water your lawn? One good way to tell is to simply walk across it. If you can see your footprints, you have a thirsty yard. Every week, your lawn should be receiving up to one inch of water. If you live in an area where it doesn't rain frequently, make sure to give your lawn the "footprint test" whenever you're not sure if it's had enough to drink.

It is obvious that plants require water to grow. It's also important to know the amount of water that particular plants actually need. Overwatering or under-watering a plant can severely damage its growth and health. Overwatering can result in root rot, where the water-filled environment encourages the growth of microbes that eat away at the roots. Under-watering a plant can make it's leaves dry and brittle.

When you are trying to decide your plant watering schedules, make sure you are testing your soil regularly. Persistent over-watering is just as likely to kill your plants as under-watering. An easy way to check is to put your fingertip in the soil, if it is moist, do not add water.

Make sure to protect your hands when working in your yard. Dirt and chemicals can be very harsh on your skin. However, the solution to this problem is very easy: gardening gloves. Gloves range from cheaper cottons (that wear easily) to more durable leather (which are more expensive). Look around your local garden supply center to find a pair of gloves that you feel comfortable working with to save your hands.

If you are growing a vegetable garden, you may find that pests can be difficult to control. It's wise to avoid harsh insecticides if you plan on consuming your fresh fruits and vegetables. Frequently check your garden for pests. If you catch them early, you can take them off the plants by hand.

One of the best things about the tips you've read in the above article is that they're all fairly simple to implement. You won't have to attend Cornell in order to become a great organic gardener. As long as you can implement what you've learned here, your garden will be fantastic.

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